Saturday, May 13, 2017

The Last Hurrah: Skylab’s 1978-1979 Unmanned Mission

"An overhead view of the Skylab space station cluster in Earth orbit as photographed from the Skylab 4 Command and Service Modules (CSM) during the final fly-around by the CSM before returning home." Feb. 8, 1974 NASA photo

All things must pass away.” -George Harrison, “All Things Must Pass”
 
According to the NASA History book Living and Working in Space: The NASA History of Skylab, Skylab 4’s commander, Gerald Carr, boosted the space station’s orbit by firing the Apollo spacecraft’s attitude-control thrusters for three minutes at the end of his crew’s 1973-1974 mission. It was then expected that the space station might remain in orbit for another nine years, through 1983. By 1977, that expectancy shifted to 1980, the solar maximum year. But in early 1978, it was clear that Skylab might come down even sooner than expected. Solar activity had been the highest ever recorded by modern instruments, and this factor increased drag on the space station.

Adding insult to injury, a proposed Space Shuttle mission to attach a Teleoperator Retrieval System to Skylab was thwarted by the fact that the shuttle wasn’t yet ready for flight (and it wouldn’t be until 1981). Faced with this turn of events, Skylab thus began its final unmanned mission – with the aid of ground controllers and computer programmers. 

Thursday, May 4, 2017

Alone As Never Before: An Interview with ‘I Love You, Michael Collins’ Author Lauren Baratz-Logsted

The man who carried the fire: a close-up of Michael Collins during an Apollo 11 press conference, May 14, 1969. Photo Credit: The Project Apollo Image Archive
  
I knew I was alone in a way that no earthling has ever been before.” - Michael Collins, Gemini 10 and Apollo 11 astronaut

Author Lauren Baratz-Logsted’s newest book, I Love You, Michael Collins (to be released June 20th by Farrar Straus Giroux), is aimed at young readers, but can appeal to anyone who remembers what it was like to be “bitten by the space bug” at a young age, or people who simply love Michael Collins, one of NASA’s most beloved figures (and trust me, there are a lot of us). Many adult readers will be able to relate to the book’s young protagonist, a 10-year-old girl named Mamie, who is assigned to write one of the Apollo 11 astronauts for a school assignment in 1969. While Mamie continues to correspond with Collins throughout the book, changes arise on the home front, motivating her to emulate her hero by “staying with the ship.”

This Space Available interviewed Baratz-Logsted this week, and asked why she focused on a lesser-known Apollo 11 astronaut, and discussed the importance of keeping young adult books historically informative, but entertaining. Note: some book spoilers included.